Just Do It? Confessions of a Failure That Has Yet to Fail

“Sit down at the machine. Turn it on. That’s right, pull up a design, put something into the hoop and don’t look back. You can do it.” – This is what I keep telling myself. Hi there. My name is Dedra and I have a fear of machine embroidery failure.

I don’t know what I’m waiting for or why I’m sitting here staring at the machine. It cannot function without me. I cannot make anything without it… I have completed a very simple dress and want to add a very simple design. Obsessing about my desire to complete the project is simply not going to get it done… Nothing to it but to do it.

Ok, so here’s the dress pattern…It’s a knit dress.

Simplicity 2054

Below is the design that I want to use that I have already loaded into 6D Premier software.  I need to figure out how to get the design onto the dress and which stabilizer to use.

Design

And now the magic happens. I zip my design over to my machine and I’m ready to “press play” and dance. Not so fast…

PROBLEM #1:

I check my thread and realize that my thread is asking for “SuRa 1169.” I check my settings to make sure that I have my thread set to Robison-Anton. Yep! Sure do! The thread is set to Robison-Anton but the design is still calling for “SuRa 1169.” Ok, fine. I own Metro Embroidery Thread ANYWAYS (I say this as I put my hands on my hips)! I’ll just open my Metro Ebroidery thread color converter! Ok, well not so fast. First I need to covert Sulky to Robison-Anton, and then convert the Robison-Anton to Metro Embroidery. Thank heavens for the thread color converter on AllThreads.com! I’ll figure out why machine is set to Robison-Anton but displaying Sulky later.

allthreads1

allthreads2

metro

All righty! Now we’re cooking with gas! Well…. maybe. Apparently I don’t own the colors that the design is requesting, but who cares, right. I’m ready to stitch! Ok, maybe no…

PROBLEM #2:

Now this screen pops up and the Royale won’t stitch. My hoop is not compatible? Really? I try “corner check” (that little icon of the box with the four arrows) and press start. I get the same message. I change from the “Sensor Q” foot to the “R” foot. Same message. I changed to a bigger hoop in spite of the fact that my design fits (with room to spare) into the 100×100.

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Houston, WE HAVE LIFTOFF!!!!! And it stitched! At the end of the day, all I wanted to do was get the darn design on my dress perfectly. I did it. Ok, well not perfectly. It’s on the darn dress and I don’t really care that in my frustration with the error message, I missed a step and didn’t align the design properly. It now looks like a pastey. I reckon I’ll have to add a few more designs to make it work. Lol! I just can’t win!

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An unbiased truth about True Bias

I attended a sewing event recently and one of the attendees mentioned “true bias” when describing the very beautiful linen mandarin jacket that she had made. “True bias?” I thought, “what the heck is that?” And it was off to Google I went. Goggle defines true bias as:

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Because I can actually read, the definition makes sense, but how exactly does that fit into what I am trying to accomplish with my sewing? It’s all a about the flow, baby! Perhaps “flow” isn’t the right word, but let’s make it fit. A garment cut on the bias has the 45 degrees flowing down over the body. Cutting fabric diagonally across the grain, causes the material to drape fluidly and elegantly across the body. It’s an expensive way to cut due to it’s inefficient use of fabric and is often used for silk or satin dresses for maximum slink factor.

Even after my elaborate understanding penned above, something was missing. It wasn’t until I spoke with Natasha over at HousefulOfNicholes that things made sense. She said, “Rememeber that skirt that you made that fit kind of funny?” Then the lightbulb went off. The skirt was cut ALL wrong and fit like a
wet sock on a cabbage patch kid.